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A brilliant way to think about museums:

jtotheizzoe:

via thebrainscoop:

The Brain Scoop
What is a Museum? 

Since my personal definition of what I believe a Museum to be has changed so much over the last few years, I’ve been really curious how others view these institutions. Are they institutions? what are they about - collections, preservation, education, display, entertainment, research? 

What do you think? How would you define a museum?

The word “museum” traces its origin to Greek, meaning a temple dedicated to the Muses, the goddesses of inspiration in art and science. And today, millennia later, I think they hold a similar purpose: spaces set aside for inspiration in the arts and sciences.

Different museums accomplish that in different ways.

Some museums focus on preservation or conservation, ensuring that the past survives into the future, and that we use the former to better the latter. These sort of institutions aren’t intended for everyone, at least not directly. They serve to inspire mainly scientists and those dedicated to the study of yesterday and tomorrow. 

Other museums focus on education. The science is often done off the exhibit floor. These museums try to enrich the present and future lives of their patrons by exposing them to worlds past. Some have broad audiences, some have specific, but I think they are democratic: Anyone who walks through their doors can see science and art come alive.

Most museums fall somewhere in the middle, trying to do the best work of both worlds.  

Ultimately, I think a museum is an institution dedicated to creating connections. A museum is a meeting point between two arrows of time, the past and the future, and two arrows of complexity, greater and lesser, that originate at the point we call us, and now.

In other words, museums are the fourth dimension.

Source: thebrainscoop
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manpodcast:

One of the painful things about seeing Detroit city manager Kevyn Orr and Christie’s auction house taking steps toward possibly selling off Detroit’s art is that there doesn’t seem to be much Joe Citizen can do about it: Detroit’s situation is so dire that the state has given the city manager extraordinary powers. The only recourse art lovers and people who care about the future of Detroit have is to publicize how the DIA has been an important part of Detroit’s past and that the institution and the art in it should be a cornerstone of Detroit’s future. Hopefully raising awareness and putting pressure on Orr and Christie’s helps keep Detroit’s art in Detroit, available to the public.

Last week thousands of art lovers took an important first step in calling attention to a disaster-in-the-making by participating in “A Day for Detroit,” which helped spotlight great works of art in the collections at the Detroit Institute for Arts. According to the DIA, over eight million people saw your tweets and blog posts. So let’s keep it going!

The Modern Art Notes Podcast wants to help draw attention to the way art at the DIA is important to Detroit’s present and future. The entire August 29 episode of The MAN Podcast will consist of segments highlighting the ways in which the DIA and the art in the collections there are vital to the city of Detroit.

Please help us help Detroit!: We want to hear about how the DIA and the art there have been a part of your life. Did the art at the DIA help you or your children understand something about the world you might not have otherwise known? Did it inspire you to create something? Or has the DIA made your life richer in another way? If you have a story of how the DIA and the art at the DIA have been important to you, your children or your family, please email The MAN Podcast at TestimonyForDetroit@gmail.com. We’ll pick as many of the best stories as we can for broadcast on Aug. 29. Please be sure to include your contact information so we can reply and record your story!

Please re-blog this, and tell a friend!

If you’re new to The Modern Art Notes Podcast:

(Image via Flickr user Jason Mrachina.)

(via waltersartmuseum)

Source: manpodcast
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unravel-history:

Kelly Clarkson recently bought Jane Austen’s ring for £152,450. It is one of only three known examples of Jane Austen’s jewellery, and thus has been declared extremely rare and a national treasure. Therefore, it has a temporary export ban. It has raised the question as to where items of national significance belong, and whether Britain should return national treasures of other nations.

unravel-history:

Kelly Clarkson recently bought Jane Austen’s ring for £152,450. It is one of only three known examples of Jane Austen’s jewellery, and thus has been declared extremely rare and a national treasure. Therefore, it has a temporary export ban. It has raised the question as to where items of national significance belong, and whether Britain should return national treasures of other nations.

Source: unravel-history
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General Slocum’s 12th Army Corps just now passed the door on their way to Harpers Ferry. Just from Gettysburg. They were at the battles on the 2d & 3d July. William M. Mullin is among them & is now in the house. He belonged to the 1st Eastern Shore (Maryland) Regiment.

Wednesday July 8, 1863 -9 ¾ o’clock AM

General Geary’s Division (12th Army Corps) are now passing the door from Gettysburg to Williamsport. They are marching in the street— one complete slurp of mud. It was raining nearly all day yesterday & night & this morning. It has been raining & is now raining. Most too bad for the poor soldiers and yet they all appear to be lively, singing & cracking jokes.

Wednesday July 8, 1863 9 ¾ o’clock AM

 - Jacob Engelbrecht’s diary

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Thanks for following, Tumblr folks! 

We’re almost at 900 fans on Facebook, and it’s a good time to thank ALL of our social media fans. Our Tumblr following is small, but mighty!

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backstoryradio:

The best representation of the Old West… Guy On A Buffalo.

One for the brudder.

Source: backstoryradio
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Pints & the Past: Bros With Beards was a rousing success! Yay!
The Prezi I put together is still live, but for now, it’s just the pictures. I’m hoping to put some of the content on it later.
Thanks to The Frederick News-Post for covering it and getting this great (if somewhat awkward) picture!

Pints & the Past: Bros With Beards was a rousing success! Yay!

The Prezi I put together is still live, but for now, it’s just the pictures. I’m hoping to put some of the content on it later.

Thanks to The Frederick News-Post for covering it and getting this great (if somewhat awkward) picture!

Photo Set

I’m so excited about my talk for our next Pints & the Past! I just watched the BBC’s movie about Beau Brummel, and I am a bit worried he’ll take up a good bit of my talk. But he is the guy who invented the suit, so maybe I’ll be justified.

(Now if only the Civil War walking tour and history bee projects would let me work on it.)

fredcohistory:

I’m working on our next Pints & the Past discussion topic, “Bros with Beards.” (It’ll take place on March 7 at 7pm at the museum. More info: http://on.fb.me/W7WFe2.)

I’m planning to give a short history of facial hair in the 19th century:

(Sidenote: I don’t know about you, but I always associate ca. 1900 men’s fashion with Paget’s illustrations for the Sherlock Holmes stories.)

How do those trends reflect changes in women’s fashion, architecture, and the decorative arts? What was happening to men’s fashion over the same time period?

I’d also like to have your input in my writing process, so what questions do you have about facial hair styles in the 1800s? Any favorite examples?

Source: fredcohistory
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"

Everyday, millions of innocent children are unwillingly part of a terrible dictatorship. The government takes them away from their families and brings them to cramped, crowded buildings where they are treated as slaves in terrible conditions. For seven hours a day, they are indoctrinated to love their current conditions and support their government and society. As if this was not enough, they are often held for another two hours to exert themselves almost to the point of physical exhaustion, and sometimes injury. Then, when at home, during the short few hours which they are permitted to see their families they are forced to do additional mind-numbing work which they finish and return the following day.

This isn’t some repressive government in some far-off country. It’s happening right here: we call it school.

"

-

When he was in the ninth grade, open-access champion Aaron Swartz, who took his life last month, stood up in front of his school assembly and read this, affirming the need to change educational paradigms away from the factory model of schooling.  (via explore-blog)

One reason I love being a museum educator: creating a free-choice learning environment. (or at least something pretty close to it)

(via explore-blog)

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museumnerd:

One argument for why museums should be free.

Source: museumnerd